EDITOR’S NOTE: Is there a pattern here? As always, nothing ever really changes with the NFL (and the NFLPA by association). After years of propaganda and misinformation, the League announced that Dr. No Ira Casson and Dr. Yes Elliot Pellman would no longer be running the MTBI Committee (that’s the MILD Traumatic Brain Injury Committee – LoL!). Just like when he was first brought on board to replace Gene Upshaw in 2009, NFLPA Executive Director DeMaurice Smith announced that he was firing the Groom Law Group because it was a conflict of interest. (But according to their latest tax returns, it turns out the NFLPA still managed to pay Groom Law Group over $1 million in fees last year.) And just like the San Diego Chargers’ controversial Dr. DWI Chao lobbied on the NFL’s behalf to ensure that Junior Seau’s brain did NOT get into the hands of pathologist and CTE scientist Dr. Bennet Omalu. It seems clear that none of these people have any intention of real change – it’s all about how much less it costs to hire PR spin doctors to change public perceptions instead. We were debating which title would be more appropriate for this post: Different Day, Same Crap! or You Can’t Make This Stuff Up!
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So now comes this latest piece from Patrick Hruby that finds Dr. Yes Elliot Pellman still working deep inside the NFL. Re-posted from Sports on Earth with permission from Patrick.
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The Wrong Man For The Job

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A short note to go along with this letter we just received from Gordon Wright (Philadelphia Eagles & New York Jets 1967 – 1970) early this morning. Gordon’s attorneys have written a letter to the NFLPA requesting all information on Gordon’s career in the NFL. Over the years, the Eagles seem to have lost any record of Gordon’s 1968 season. Maybe this is one for the IRS and a look at the Eagles bank records? Are there any old teammates from the Eagles out there who may have played with Gordon in 1968? (We posted more details about Gordon’s situation back in 2010 and still nothing two years later – not even any clarification. Read that 2010 post by clicking HERE.
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EDITOR’S NOTE: We’ve uploaded of Gordon’s letter to Scribd for easy viewing and to make it downloadable for printing. You can also click the Enlarge icon in the lower right corner of the menu at the bottom of the viewing screen to go Full Screen for easier reading (just hit the ESC key to close):
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Gordon Wright Letter to NFLPA
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We’ve got some news and thoughts that have come in from two of the retirees out there and felt it would be best to share it with everyone here in one post.
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This past year, Larry Kaminski has been going through the California Workers Compensation process to gain access to his disability benefits.
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 John WelbournHi Dave -

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Irv Cross has had a long and well-respected career in professional football. Drafted by the Eagles in 1961, Irv spent 9 years as a defensive back, eventually playing his last year with the LA Rams in ’69. In 1971, Irv became the first African-American national NFL analyst for CBS. Then in 1975, he started a 15-year career as co-anchor on the newly-created NFL Today, which completely changed the way football coverage was broadcast on television. Last August, The Washington Examiner had a short piece on Irv’s life and career - click HERE to read the article. Without further introduction, here’s Irv’s story:

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Read into it what you will but we don’t recall too many times when the NFLPA has stepped into an arbitration hearing for a retired player in the past. What we really have a problem understanding is why the NFL insists on asking for arbitration anyway. Wouldn’t it have been easier – and a whole lot smarter – just to have paid these guys their Severance Pay in the first place? (Click on the images to enlarge for easier reading.)

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For the past couple of days, we had a run of comments on an earlier post between Burt Grossman and Lionel James about their missing Severance Pay. It turns out that Burt has been going in circles with the NFL, the Eagles front office and the NFLPA trying to get the $40,000 in severance that he had coming after retiring from the Eagles in 1994 based on rules set out in the CBA. We even put him in touch with Mitchell Welch from Gay Culverhouse’s Players’ Outreach so they could see firsthand how little assistance retired players can expect once they’re out of the game. Like the old expression goes: The lights are on but no one’s home.

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