USAToday: Chargers 'devastated' by ex-DB Paul Oliver's suicide at 29    League of Denial: The NFL’s Concussion Crisis, will air on FRONTLINE on October 8 & 15. Check your local listings    LA Times: Deion Sanders, critic of NFL concussion suits, seeks workers' comp    FOXSports: NFL, players reach proposed $765M settlement of concussion-related lawsuits    Sean Pamphilon's United States of Football in theaters starting Aug 23rd!    Washington Post: Do no harm: Who should bear the costs of retired NFL players’ medical bills?    You can catch all the posts and videos from our recent Third Annual Football Veterans Conference - everything now posted here on Dave's Blog!

Posted with the express consent of Evan Weiner:
.

.
THE BUSINESS AND POLITICS OF SPORTS
.
BY EVAN WEINER
COMMENTARY
.

The NFL is in Crisis Mode

continue reading »

EDITOR’S NOTE: Is there a pattern here? As always, nothing ever really changes with the NFL (and the NFLPA by association). After years of propaganda and misinformation, the League announced that Dr. No Ira Casson and Dr. Yes Elliot Pellman would no longer be running the MTBI Committee (that’s the MILD Traumatic Brain Injury Committee – LoL!). Just like when he was first brought on board to replace Gene Upshaw in 2009, NFLPA Executive Director DeMaurice Smith announced that he was firing the Groom Law Group because it was a conflict of interest. (But according to their latest tax returns, it turns out the NFLPA still managed to pay Groom Law Group over $1 million in fees last year.) And just like the San Diego Chargers’ controversial Dr. DWI Chao lobbied on the NFL’s behalf to ensure that Junior Seau’s brain did NOT get into the hands of pathologist and CTE scientist Dr. Bennet Omalu. It seems clear that none of these people have any intention of real change – it’s all about how much less it costs to hire PR spin doctors to change public perceptions instead. We were debating which title would be more appropriate for this post: Different Day, Same Crap! or You Can’t Make This Stuff Up!
.
So now comes this latest piece from Patrick Hruby that finds Dr. Yes Elliot Pellman still working deep inside the NFL. Re-posted from Sports on Earth with permission from Patrick.
.

SportsonEarthlogojpg
.
The Wrong Man For The Job

continue reading »

Posted with the express consent of Evan Weiner:
.

.
THE BUSINESS AND POLITICS OF SPORTS
.
BY EVAN WEINER
COMMENTARY
.
The NFL job audition includes making the “suicide squad” rather than the special teams squad
.
May 11, 2013
Examiner
.
LIFE Suicide Squad Cover 1971The National Football League is open for business again. Players are on the field showing coaches that they can indeed play football even though the season is months away. The players showcasing their talents aren’t the normal, everyday players. No – these guys on the field are young guys trying to catch the eye of a coach and make a team and it doesn’t matter if they are first round draft picks or free agents hoping to just get to a training camp in July.
.
Not much is said about the long term health of these guys; they are just anxious to play football. Another one-time former football player, George Sauer, Jr. passed away at 69 years of age this week from congestive heart failure and Alzheimer’s disease. There may be some unintentional irony in Sauer’s passing from Alzheimer’s disease as he walked away from the New York Jets and the National Football League after the 1970 season because he found pro football dehumanizing and it “both glorifies and destroys bodies” as he described in a 1983 article in the New York Times.
.
Sauer was a wide receiver.
.
The young guys trying to impress the coaches in all likelihood never heard of George Sauer. But they probably know Tedy Bruschi who played for the New England Patriots (1996 – 2008) and is now a football commentator on ESPN.
. continue reading »

A short note to go along with this letter we just received from Gordon Wright (Philadelphia Eagles & New York Jets 1967 – 1970) early this morning. Gordon’s attorneys have written a letter to the NFLPA requesting all information on Gordon’s career in the NFL. Over the years, the Eagles seem to have lost any record of Gordon’s 1968 season. Maybe this is one for the IRS and a look at the Eagles bank records? Are there any old teammates from the Eagles out there who may have played with Gordon in 1968? (We posted more details about Gordon’s situation back in 2010 and still nothing two years later – not even any clarification. Read that 2010 post by clicking HERE.
.
EDITOR’S NOTE: We’ve uploaded of Gordon’s letter to Scribd for easy viewing and to make it downloadable for printing. You can also click the Enlarge icon in the lower right corner of the menu at the bottom of the viewing screen to go Full Screen for easier reading (just hit the ESC key to close):
.
Gordon Wright Letter to NFLPA
.

Random News

23 September 2012

Some bits-and-pieces of information that have come in, starting with an interesting observation from disability attorney John Hogan (if anyone has heard anything about these reps on disability improvements, please feel free to let us know):
.
Article 61, Sec. 5 of the new CBA, which became effective over a year ago, provided for “further disability improvements” and that each side would appoint representatives not later than October 31, 2011 to consider these further improvements. I have no idea who was appointed and I have no idea if they have even met. Perhaps more importantly, no one we know has heard from ANY retired player who might have been consulted on what further improvements are needed.
.
========================================
.
At Sean Pamphilon’s movie preview in Pittsburgh last week, Dave also had the opportunity to spend a bit of time with Leonard Marshall (1983 – 1994: New York Giants, New York Jets, Washington Redskins). Leonard’s book When the Cheering Stops: Bill Parcells, the 1990 New York Giants, and the Price of Greatness (co-authored with journalist William Bendetson) was released this past spring and provides a unique inside view of football from his days on the field interwoven with intimate stories about life after the game off the field. Here are two of Leonard’s interviews from last spring:
.

.

.

Football damaged my brain and it didn’t have to happen

GEORGE VISGER, a former 49er, tells his story
.
Due to the size and speed of today’s football players, the kinetic energy they generate during hits can have long-term consequences. Here’s my story:
.
My football career began at age 11 in 1970 when I suited up for the West Stockton Bear Cubs, the first Pee Wee Pop Warner team fielded in Stockton, Calif. Of the 29 kids on the team, three went on to sign NFL contracts in 1980 (myself — sixth round, New York Jets; Jack Cosgrove — eighth round, Seattle Seahawks; Pat Bowe — free agent, Green Bay Packers).
.
During my third year of Pop Warner, I was hospitalized when I knocked myself unconscious during a tackling drill. The exercise was a needless bull-in-the-ring drill that was more of a gladiator competition for the coaches’ amusement than a means of teaching useful techniques to young players.
.
The coaches had us form a big circle about 25 yards across and numbered the 40 of us 1 to 20 on each side. When your number was called, you and the player on the other side with the same number sprinted directly at each other and hit head-to-head.
.
Concussions followed throughout my high school career, though I never missed a game or practice. In my senior year, we went 11-0 and ranked No. 3 in California. I was selected to the All-America Top 100 Team.
.
I entered the University of Colorado on a football scholarship in 1976 as a 6-foot, 5-inch 235-pound defensive tackle, majoring in biology. I was a starter for three years and suffered a number of minor concussions, but I never missed a play except after leg injuries.
.

Turning pro

continue reading »

We’ve got some news and thoughts that have come in from two of the retirees out there and felt it would be best to share it with everyone here in one post.
.

This past year, Larry Kaminski has been going through the California Workers Compensation process to gain access to his disability benefits.
. continue reading »

Posted with the express consent of Evan Weiner:

THE BUSINESS AND POLITICS OF SPORTS
.
Former New York Jets great Marty Lyons says retired players need health benefits now
Thursday, 19 May 2011
BY EVAN WEINER
NEWJERSEYNEWSROOM.COM
.
THE BUSINESS AND POLITICS OF SPORTS
.

lyonsMarty0518111_optNEW YORK. N.Y. — In October 1987, New York Jets defensive lineman Marty Lyons decided to cross a picket line and play football because he didn’t like the way National Football League Players Association Executive Director Gene Upshaw was conducting the association’s business. The NFLPA went on strike looking for a liberalized form of free agency and more money. The NFLPA didn’t bother asking for after-career lifetime health benefits.
.
Lyons has never looked back at his decision to cross the picket line and in hindsight thinks the 1987 four-week strike was a waste of time.
.
“I don’t worry about it, I got more important things to do than worry about a labor dispute, worry about a lockout” said Lyons on Tuesday at the announcement that he was elected into the College Football Hall of Fame. “I got four kids, I try to be the best father, best husband that I can to them. Whatever happens in this dispute, they will settle it.
. continue reading »

EDITOR’S NOTE: Gordon Wright played for four seasons: 1967 – 1968 for the Philadelphia Eagles and then 1969 – 1971 for the New York Jets. Like most retired players, Gordon’s been trying to access his full disability and pension benefits for years now and it’s finally reached the courts.

.

continue reading »

Disability Benefits con’d

26 November 2008

Maybe it’s the Thanksgiving weekend coming up or maybe the retired players’ disability problems are finally coming to the forefront in the media. Right after the St. Petersburg piece came out on Dave, Jim Baumbach wrote a story on Wesley Walker (New York Jets) in Newsday. Some clips from the story:

continue reading »